Tag: tips-&-tricks

Report Link: Save before Navigation

“We always click ‘Apply Changes’, then we click the button we actually wanted” – a user

Typically an Apex report with an “Open” or “Edit” icon will simply do an immediate navigation to the target page, passing the ID of the record to edit. When the user clicks this link, the page is not submitted and the user is instead redirected.

It’s easy to quickly build large and complex applications in Apex but it’s also very easy to build something that confuses and disorients your users. They only need one instance when something doesn’t work how they expected it to, and they will lose trust in your application.

For example: if most buttons save their changes, but one button doesn’t, they might not notice straight away, and then wonder what happened to their work. If you’re lucky, they will raise a defect notice and you can fix it. More likely (and worse), they’ll decide it’s their fault, and begrudgingly accept slow and unnecessary extra steps as part of the process.

You can improve this situation by taking care to ensure that everything works the way your users expect. For most buttons in an Apex page, this is easy and straightforward: just make sure the buttons submit the page. The only buttons that should do a redirect are those that a user should expect will NOT save the changes – e.g. a “Cancel” button.

For the example of an icon in a report region, it’s not so straightforward. The page might include some editable items (e.g. a page for editing a “header” record) – and if the user doesn’t Save their changes before clicking the report link their changes will be lost on navigation.

To solve this problem you can make the edit links first submit the page before navigating. The way I do this is as follows (in this example, the report query is on the “emp” table:

    1. Add a hidden item P1_EDIT_ID to the page
      • Set Value Protected to No
    2. Add something like this to the report query (without the newlines):
      'javascript:apex.submit(
        {request:''SAVE_EDIT_ROW'',
         set:{''P1_EDIT_ID'':''' || emp.rec_id || '''}
        })' AS edit_link
      • Set this new column to Hidden Column
    3. Modify the edit link Target:
      • Type = URL
      • URL = #EDIT_LINK#
    4. Add a Branch at point “After Processing”
      • Set the Target to the page to navigate to
      • Set the item for the record ID to &P1_EDIT_ID.
      • Set the Condition to the following PL/SQL Expression:
        :REQUEST='SAVE_EDIT_ROW' AND :P1_EDIT_ID IS NOT NULL
      • Make sure the branch is evaluated before any other branches (at least, any others that might respond to this request)
    5. Modify any existing Processing so that the request SAVE_EDIT_ROW will cause any changes on the page to be saved.

You can, of course, choose different item names and request names if needed (just update it in the code you entered earlier). For example, to make it work with the default Apex DML process you might need to use a request like “APPLY_CHANGES_EDIT_ROW”.

Now, when the user makes some changes to the form, then clicks one of the record Edit links, the page will first be submitted before navigating to the child row.

Adding buttons to Apex pages is easy. Making sure every last one of them does exactly what the user expects, nothing more, and nothing less, is the tricky part!

Checkbox Item check / uncheck all

If you have an ordinary checkbox item based on a list of values, here is a function which will set all the values to checked or unchecked:

function checkboxSetAll (item,checked) {
  $("#"+item+" input[type=checkbox]").attr('checked',checked);
  $("#"+item).trigger("change");
}

For example:

checkboxSetAll("P1_ITEM", true); //select all
checkboxSetAll("P1_ITEM", false); //select none

It works this way because a checkbox item based on a LOV is generated as a set of checkbox input items within a fieldset.

Note: If it’s a checkbox column in a report, you can use this trick instead: Select All / Unselect All Checkbox in Interactive Report Header

Declarative Tabular Form dynamic totals

A common Apex project is to take a customer’s existing spreadsheet-based solution and convert it more-or-less as is into Apex. I’ve got one going at the moment, a budgeting solution where users need to enter their budget requests. They currently enter their requests into an XLS template file which generates subtotals and totals for them.

To do this in Apex I’m going to use a tabular form, and to do the subtotals I’ll use jQuery in a way not too dissimilar to that I described earlier.

Here is a mockup of the screen so far:

apex-grid-sheet

There are column totals that need to be added up and updated dynamically (indicated by the green arrows) as well as subtotals within each row (indicated by the red arrows).

I started by looking at the generated items, getting their ids (e.g. “f09_0001” etc) and writing the jQuery code to detect changes, add them up, and put the totals in the relevant items. I then started repeating this code for each column, and thought “hmmm”.

There were two problems with this approach that I could foresee:

  1. The generated ids in a tabular form can change if the structure of the query changes  – e.g. what was f08 + f09 => f10 might change to f09 + f10 => f11
  2. I was aware of another form that I would need to build, with a similar structure except that there will be two sets of “Jan-Jun” + “Jul-Dec” columns, each with their own subtotal.

I wanted a more declarative solution, so that the heavy lifting will be done in one set of generic javascript functions, and I simply need to put attributes in the relevant columns to activate them. This is how I’ve approached this:

  • Create the tabular form as usual (mine is based on an Apex Collection) and remove the standard DML processes, replaced with my own that calls APEX_COLLECTION instead.
  • Create a standard report that generates the total items by calling APEX_ITEM.text, with p_attributes=>'data-total="x"' (with a different “x” for each column, e.g. year1).
  • Set the Static ID on the tabular form region (e.g. tabularform).
  • Set Element Attributes on the Jan-Jun column to data-cell="year1" data-col="year1_jan_jun", similarly for the Jul_Dec column.
  • Set Element Attributes on all the Year columns in the tabular form to data-col="yearx", where x is 1..5.
  • Set Element Attributes on the total for the first year to data-subtotal="year1".

The following is the query for the totals report region:

select APEX_ITEM.text(1, TO_CHAR(SUM(year1_jan_jun),'FM999G999G999G999G990D00'), p_size=>10, p_maxlength=>2000,
       p_attributes=>'disabled=true class="edit_money" data-total="year1_jan_jun"') as year1_jan_jun
      ,APEX_ITEM.text(2, TO_CHAR(SUM(year1_jul_dec),'FM999G999G999G999G990D00'), p_size=>10, p_maxlength=>2000,
       p_attributes=>'disabled=true class="edit_money" data-total="year1_jul_dec"') as year1_jul_dec
      ,APEX_ITEM.text(3, TO_CHAR(SUM(year1_total),'FM999G999G999G999G990D00'), p_size=>10, p_maxlength=>2000,
       p_attributes=>'disabled=true class="edit_money" data-total="year1"') as year1_total
      ,APEX_ITEM.text(4, TO_CHAR(SUM(year2_total),'FM999G999G999G999G990D00'), p_size=>10, p_maxlength=>2000,
       p_attributes=>'disabled=true class="edit_money" data-total="year2"') as year2_total
      ,APEX_ITEM.text(5, TO_CHAR(SUM(year3_total),'FM999G999G999G999G990D00'), p_size=>10, p_maxlength=>2000,
       p_attributes=>'disabled=true class="edit_money" data-total="year3"') as year3_total
      ,APEX_ITEM.text(6, TO_CHAR(SUM(year4_total),'FM999G999G999G999G990D00'), p_size=>10, p_maxlength=>2000,
       p_attributes=>'disabled=true class="edit_money" data-total="year4"') as year4_total
      ,APEX_ITEM.text(7, TO_CHAR(SUM(year5_total),'FM999G999G999G999G990D00'), p_size=>10, p_maxlength=>2000,
       p_attributes=>'disabled=true class="edit_money" data-total="year5"') as year5_total
from budget_collection_vw

So, to summarise: all the data-cell items get totalled to the data-subtotal item in the same row; and all the data-col items get totalled to the data-total item below the tabular form.

To do all the hard work, I’ve added the following code to my page’s Function and Global Variable Declaration:

function getSum (qry) {
  //get the sum over all items matching the given jQuery search criterion
  var t = 0;
  $(qry).each(function() {
    t += parseFloat($(this).val().replace(/,/g,''))||0;
  });
  return t;
}

function updateSubTotal (item) {
  // update a row-level subtotal
  // the items to add up are identified by data-cell="x"
  // the item to show the total is identified by data-subtotal="x"
  var cell = $(item).data("cell") //get the data-cell attribute
     ,rn = $(item).prop("id").split("_")[1]
     ,t = getSum("input[data-cell='"+cell+"'][id$='_"+rn+"']");

  // we need to temporarily enable then disable the subtotal
  // item in order for the change event to fire
  $("input[data-subtotal="+cell+"][id$='_"+rn+"']")
    .val(t.formatMoney())
    .prop("disabled",false)
    .trigger("change")
    .prop("disabled",true);
}

function updateTotal (item) {
  // update a column total
  var col = $(item).data("col") //get the data-col attribute
     ,t = getSum("input[data-col='"+col+"']");

  $("input[data-total="+col+"]")
    .val(t.formatMoney())
    .trigger("change");
}

The updateSubTotal and updateTotal functions may get moved to my global javascript file later.

I put this in Execute when Page Loads:

$("#tabularform").on("change", "input[data-cell]", function(){
  updateSubTotal(this);
});
$("#tabularform").on("change", "input[data-col]", function(){
  updateTotal(this);
});

In case you’re wondering, I’m re-using the formatMoney function here.

There’s a number of things happening here. On page load, we add a listener for changes to any input item that has a data-cell attribute; this calls updateSubTotal, which detects the row number for the triggering item, adds up all the values for any input item that has the same data-cell value; and puts the total in the input item with a matching data-subtotal attribute.

We also have a listener for changes to any item with a data-col class; when these are changed, updateTotal adds up any item with the same attribute, and puts the total in an item with attribute data-total.

The jQuery selector [id$='_"+rn+"'] makes sure that the row-level code only finds items ending with the given row number (i.e. '*_0001').

The benefit of this declarative approach is that it is much easier to re-use and adapt.

EDIT: fixed the change trigger so that I don’t need to call updateTotal from updateSubTotal.

BIG checkboxes

Getting older, it’s getting harder to see and click those tiny checkboxes…

checkboxestoosmall

csscheckboxes

input[type=checkbox] {
/* Double-sized Checkboxes */
-ms-transform: scale(2); /* IE */
-moz-transform: scale(2); /* FF */
-webkit-transform: scale(2); /* Safari and Chrome */
-o-transform: scale(2); /* Opera */
}

checkboxesbig

CAN YOU SEE THEM NOW? Ah, good. That’s all right then.

Brought to you by dept-of-coding-by-copy-and-paste.

Refresh Apex Calendar

calendarwithrefreshbutton.PNG
Sometimes it’s the simple little things that can add polish and make your Apex application shine. One simple little thing that you can do is add a Refresh button to improve the usability of your Apex 5 calendar. This makes it easy for the user to see recent changes on the database, e.g. if events had been added or changed since the page had last been loaded.

  1. Set the Static ID on the Calendar region (e.g. “eventscalendar“)
  2. Add an Icon button (Button Template = “Icon”) to the calendar region
  3. Set the button’s Static ID (e.g. “refreshbutton“)
  4. Set Icon CSS Classes to “fa-refresh
  5. Set Action to “Defined by Dynamic Action”
  6. (optional) Set Template Option -> Style to “Remove UI Decoration”
  7. Add a Dynamic Action to the button, Event = “Click”
  8. Set Fire on Page Load to “No”
  9. Add a True Action “Execute Javascript Code” with the code below:
$("#eventscalendar_calendar").fullCalendar("refetchEvents");

This calls the refetchEvents method of the FullCalendar object. Replace the “eventscalendar” part of the id with whatever static ID you set on the Calendar region in step #1.

Now, to add a bit of pizzazz you can get the refresh button icon to spin while the calendar is being refreshed. To do this, change the dynamic action code to this instead:

$("#refreshbutton span.t-Icon").addClass("fa-spin");
window.setTimeout(function() {
  $("#eventscalendar_calendar").fullCalendar("refetchEvents");
  window.setTimeout(function() {
    $("#refreshbutton span.t-Icon").removeClass("fa-spin");
  }, 1000);
}, 50);

This code starts the refresh icon spinning before invoking refetchEvents, then stops the icon spinning after it has completed. Note that these are done via timeouts (otherwise the icon isn’t repainted until after the entire javascript function has completed). I added a wait of 1 second prior to stopping the spinning because most of the time the refresh is too quick to notice the spinning effect.

You can, if it makes sense in your case, also make the calendar automatically refresh itself periodically, using some simple javascript: add the following function to the page Function and Global Variable Declaration:

function refreshCalendar() {
  $("#refreshbutton span.t-Icon").addClass("fa-spin");
  window.setTimeout(function() {
    $("#eventscalendar_calendar").fullCalendar("refetchEvents");
    window.setTimeout(function() {
      $("#refreshbutton span.t-Icon").removeClass("fa-spin");
    }, 1000);
  }, 50);
}

Then add this to start the timer in the page attribute Execute when Page Loads:

var periodicrefresh = setInterval(function() {
                                    refreshCalendar();
                                  }, 30000);

In this example, I’ve set the timer to go off every 30 seconds. Not only does it refresh the calendar, but the user gets feedback on what’s going on because the refresh button icon is spinning. Be careful not to set the timeout too low, or else your database could get very busy!

The function I’ve declared can now also be reused by the button’s dynamic action, so I can replace the DA javascript with simply:

refreshCalendar();