A nice Descending Index Range Scan

I’ve been aware of some of the ways that Oracle database optimises index accesses for queries, but I’m also aware that you have to test each critical query to ensure that the expected optimisations are taking effect.

I had this simple query, the requirement of which is to get the “previous status” for a record from a journal table. Since the journal table records all inserts, updates and deletes, and this query is called immediately after an update, to get the previous status we need to query the journal for the record most recently prior to the most recent record. Since the “version_id” column is incremented for each update, we can use that as the sort order.


select status_code
from (select rownum rn, status_code
      from   xxtim_requests$jn jn
      where  jn.trq_id = :trq_id
      order by version_id desc)
where rn = 2;

The xxtim_requests$jn table has an ordinary index on (trq_id, version_id). This query is embedded in some PL/SQL with an INTO clause – so it will only fetch one record (plus a 2nd fetch to detect TOO_MANY_ROWS which we know won’t happen).

The table is relatively small (in dev it only has 6K records, and production data volumes are expected to grow very slowly) but regardless, I was pleased to find that (at least, in Oracle 12.1) it uses a nice optimisation so that it not only uses the index, it is choosing to use a Descending scan on it – which means it avoids a SORT operation, and should very quickly return the 2nd record that we desire.

index_scan_range_descending.PNG

It looks quite similar in effect to the “COUNT STOPKEY” optimisation you can see on “ROWNUM=1” queries. If this was a much larger table and this query needed to be faster or was being run more frequently, I’d probably consider appending status_code to the index in order to avoid the table access. In this case, however, I don’t think it’s necessary.

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