Enhancement Request for SQL Developer for users of Logger

Juergen Schuster, who has been enthusiastically trying OraOpenSource Logger, raised an idea for the debug/instrumentation library requesting the addition of a standard synonym “l” for the package. The motive behind this request was to allow our PL/SQL code to remain easy to read, in spite of all the calls to logger sprinkled throughout that are needed for effective debugging and instrumentation.

In the judgement of some (myself included) the addition of the synonym to the standard package would run the risk of causing clashes on some people’s systems; and ensuring that Logger is installable on all systems “out of the box” should, I think, take precedence.

However, the readability of code is still an issue; so it was with that in mind that I suggested that perhaps an enhancement of our favourite development IDE would go a long way to improving the situation.

Therefore, I have raised the following enhancement request at the SQL Developer Exchange:

Logger: show/hide or dim (highlight) debug/instrumentation code

“The oracle open source Logger instrumentation library is gaining popularity and it would be great to build some specific support for it into SQL Developer, whether as a plugin or builtin. To enhance code readability, it would be helpful for PL/SQL developers to be able to hide/show, or dim (e.g. grey highlight) any code calling their preferred debug/instrumentation library (e.g. Logger).

“One way I expect this might work is that the Code Editor would be given a configurable list of oracle object identifiers (e.g. “logger”, “logger_logs”); any PL/SQL declarations or lines of code containing references to these objects would be greyed out, or be able to be rolled up (with something like the +/- gutter buttons).”

Mockup #1 (alternative syntax highlighting option):

loggerdim

Mockup #2 (identifier slugs in header bar to show/hide, with icons in the gutter showing where lines have been hidden):

loggerdim2.png

“Gold-plated” Option: add an option to the SQL Editor’s right-click context menu – on any identifier, select “Hide all lines with reference to this” and it adds the identifier to the list of things that are hidden!

If you like the idea (or at least agree with the motive behind it) please vote for it.

Restriction when column default is sequence.nextval

Oracle 12c introduced the ability to specify sequence.nextval as the default on a column, which is really nice – including the fact that it eliminates one of your excuses why you don’t decommission those old triggers.

Unfortunately it doesn’t work as you might expect if you use an INSERT ALL statement; it evaluates the default expression once per statement, instead of once per row.

Test case:


create sequence test_seq;

create table test_tab
( id number default test_seq.nextval primary key
, dummy varchar2(100) not null );

insert into test_tab (dummy) values ('xyz');

1 row inserted.

insert all
into test_tab (dummy) values ('abc')
into test_tab (dummy) values ('def')
select null from dual;

Error report -
SQL Error: ORA-00001: unique constraint
(SCOTT.SYS_C00123456) violated

A minor issue, usually, but something to be aware of – especially if you’re not in the habit of declaring your unique constraints to the database!

create sequence test_seq;

create table test_stupid_tab
( id number default test_seq.nextval
, dummy varchar2(100) not null );

insert into test_tab (dummy) values ('xyz');

1 row inserted.

insert all
into test_tab (dummy) values ('abc')
into test_tab (dummy) values ('def')
select null from dual;

2 rows inserted.

select * from test_tab;

i dummy
= =====
1 xyz
2 abc
2 def

ADDENDUM 28/10/2016

Another similar scenario which might trip you up is where you are inserting from a UNION view:

create sequence test_seq;

create table test_tab
( id number default test_seq.nextval primary key
, dummy varchar2(100) not null
);

insert into test_tab (dummy) select 'x' from dual;
-- success

insert into test_tab (dummy)
select 'y' from dual union all select 'z' from dual;
-- fails with ORA-01400 "cannot insert NULL into id"

insert into test_tab (dummy) select c from (
select 'y' c from dual union all select 'z' from dual
);
-- success

Must See: AUSOUG Connect 2016 Perth

banner_oaug-web

If you can get yourself to Perth in November, you must try to get to AUSOUG Connect. Here is my “Must See” list based on the current program (subject to change):

Monday 7 Nov

Tuesday 8 Nov

Lots of Apex goodies, a new (to me, at least) database IDE, plus plenty of solid Oracle database content – there’ll probably be a few conflicts leading to some decisions to make on the day.

I’m looking forward to a long-awaited return of the AUSOUG conference series – I hope to see you all there.

Send SMS, MMS and Voice messages from Oracle PL/SQL

testing receipt of sms and mms

If you need to send almost any message to almost any phone from your Oracle database, and you want to use straight PL/SQL, you may want to consider using my Clicksend API.

  • SMS (Short Message Service)
  • MMS (Multimedia Message Service)
  • Text to Voice

I have released the first beta version of my Oracle PL/SQL API for Clicksend. Read the installation instructions, API reference and download the release from here:

https://jeffreykemp.github.io/clicksend-plsql-api/

Sending an SMS is as simple as adding this anywhere in your code:

begin
  clicksend_pkg.send_sms
    (p_sender  => 'TheDatabase'
    ,p_mobile  => '+61411111111'
    ,p_message => 'G''day, this is your database!'
    );
  clicksend_pkg.push_queue;
  commit;
end;

All you need to do is signup for a Clicksend account. You’ll only be charged for messages actually sent, but they do require you to pay in advance – e.g. $20 gets you about 300 messages (Australian numbers). You can get test settings so that you can try it out for free.

I’ve been using Clicksend for years now, and have been satisfied with their service and the speed and reliability of getting messages to people’s mobiles. When I encountered any issues, a chat with their support quickly resolved them, and they were quick to offer free credits when things weren’t working out as expected.

If you want to send a photo to someone’s phone via MMS (although I’m not sure what the use-case for this might be), you need to first upload the image somewhere online, because the API only accepts a URL. In my case, I would use the Amazon S3 API from the Alexandria PL/SQL Library, then pass the generated URL to the clicksend API. There is a file upload feature that ClickSend provides, I plan to add an API call to take advantage of this which will make this seamless – and provide some file conversion capabilities as well.

begin
  clicksend_pkg.send_mms
    (p_sender  => 'TheDatabase'
    ,p_mobile  => '+61411111111'
    ,p_subject => 'G''Day!'
    ,p_message => 'This is an MMS from your database!'
    ,p_media_file_url =>
'https://s3-ap-southeast-2.amazonaws.com/jk64/jk64logo.jpg'
    );
  clicksend_pkg.push_queue;
  commit;
end;

You can send a voice message to someone (e.g. if they don’t have a mobile phone) using the Text to Voice API.

begin
  clicksend_pkg.send_voice
    (p_phone_no     => '+61411111111'
    ,p_message      => 'Hello. This message was sent from your database. '
                    || 'Have a nice day.'
    ,p_voice_lang   => 'en-gb' -- British English
    ,p_voice_gender => 'male'
    ,p_schedule_dt  => sysdate + interval '2' minute
    );
  clicksend_pkg.push_queue;
  commit;
end;

You have to tell the API what language the message is in. For a number of languages, you can specify the accent/dialect (e.g. American English, British English, or Aussie) and gender (male or female). You can see the full list here.

All calls to the send_sms, send_mms and send_voice procedures use Oracle AQ to make the messages transactional. It’s up to you to either COMMIT or ROLLBACK, which determines whether the message is actually sent or not. All messages go into a single queue.

You can have a message be scheduled at a particular point in time by setting the p_schedule_dt parameter.

The default installation creates a job that runs every 5 minutes to push the queue. You can also call push_queue directly in your code after calling a send_xxx procedure. This creates a job to push the queue as well, so it won’t interfere with your transaction.

All messages get logged in a table, clicksend_msg_log. The log includes a column clicksend_cost which allows you to monitor your costs. To check your account balance, call get_credit_balance.

Please try it out if you can and let me know of any issues or suggestions for improvement.

Link: https://jeffreykemp.github.io/clicksend-plsql-api/

File Upload Improvements in Apex 5.1

Warning: this is based on the Apex 5.1 Early Adopter and details may change.

file_upload_5_1_ea

The standard File Upload item type is getting a nice little upgrade in Apex 5.1. By simply changing attributes on the item, you can allow users to select multiple files (from a single directory) at the same time.

In addition, you can now restrict the type of file they may choose, according to the MIME type of the file, e.g. image/jpg. This file type restriction can use a wildcard, e.g. image/*, and can have multiple patterns separated by commas, e.g. image/png,application/pdf.

file_upload_5_1_ea_demo

Normally, to access the file that was uploaded you would query APEX_APPLICATION_TEMP_FILES with a predicate like name = :P1_FILE_ITEM. If multiple files are allowed, however, the item will be set to a comma-delimited list of names, so the suggested code to get the files is:

declare
  arr apex_global.vc_arr2;
begin
  arr := apex_util.string_to_table(:P1_MULTIPLE_FILES);
  for i in 1..arr.count loop
    select t.whatever
    into   your_variable
    from   apex_application_temp_files t
    where  t.name = arr(i);
  end loop;
end;

You can play with a simple demo here: https://apexea.oracle.com/pls/apex/f?p=UPLOAD_DEMO&cs=JK64 (login as demo / demodemo).

If you want to support drag-and-drop, image copy&paste, load large files asynchronously, or restrict the maximum file size that may be uploaded, you will probably want to consider a plugin instead, like Daniel Hochleitner’s DropZone.