Month: March 2012

Alexandria: May Cause Addiction

Ever since I downloaded the Alexandria PL/SQL library, I haven’t been able to put it down. Just recently I decided I wanted to serve up a whole lot of media files directly from Amazon’s S3 simple storage service, instead of serving them from within my EC2 (elastic compute) instance. They were just wasting my linux server’s time responding to http requests.

So, I quickly wrote the following code to transfer them:

  l_blob BLOB;
  /* initialise my AWS session */
    ( 'yyy-my-aws-id-yyy'
    , 'xxx-not-telling-xxx'
    , p_gmt_offset => -8);
  FOR rec IN (
    SELECT id, filename, mime_type, location
    FROM myfiles
    WHERE location = 'http://myserver/media/'
  ) LOOP
    /* read the file from its current location */
    l_blob := ALEX.http_util_pkg.get_blob_from_url
      (rec.location || rec.filename);
    IF DBMS_LOB.getLength(l_blob) > 0 THEN
      /* upload the file to Amazon S3 */
        ( 'mybucket'
        , rec.filename
        , l_blob
        , rec.mime_type
        , ALEX.amazon_aws_s3_pkg.g_acl_public_read);
      UPDATE myfiles
      SET location = ''
      WHERE id =;
    END IF;

After a short while, all the files had been copied across to my bucket on S3, and my table updated so that my web site now points people’s browsers to the new location for those files.

Of course, I could have used UTL_FILE to read the files from disk, but then I’d have to first create a directory, and write a loop to read the file in chunks into the BLOB. Why bother with all that when I can just call http_util_pkg.get_blog_from_url and get it all in one go?

That’s the trouble with powerful utilities like Alexandria: they’re too easy to use, make tasks like this trivial, and you start finding all sorts of uses for them. All of a sudden, Alexandria is your hammer, and the world is full of nails.

See also: this quick intro to using Alexandria’s API for Amazon S3.

Generating unique identifiers with “SELECT MAX(id) + 1”

Normally, when you see code like this in a production system, you should duck your head and run:

SELECT NVL( MAX( id ), 0 ) + 1
INTO   :new_id
FROM   mytable;

What’s wrong with this code?

I hope the first answer that rolls off your tongue has something to do with concurrency – i.e. two sessions that run this around the same time will not see uncommitted rows from each other, and so are likely to try to insert rows with conflicting identifiers.

I hope the second answer that you might mention has to do with performance – even considering there’s a unique index on the column, this code will still need to read at least one index block to get the latest ID (assuming the query optimiser chooses to do a MIN/MAX index scan so that it doesn’t have to scan the entire index before returning a result). In a high load system this cost might be unacceptable.

Of course, the first problem (concurrency) could be solved by serializing access to the “get the next ID” function, e.g. with a DBMS_LOCK. We all know, however, that there’s no sane reason to serialize this when Oracle already provides a perfectly good mechanism for generating unique IDs, with virtually no serialization – sequences.


Sequences have the benefits of guaranteeing uniqueness, and if their “cache” setting is set appropriately, will add a negligible amount of overhead for serialization.

Problem solved. Easy, right? I bet you’re wondering why I added the word “Normally” to my first sentence in this post….

Question: When might using “SELECT MAX(id) + 1” ever be an acceptable source of unique identifiers?

Answer: Global Temporary tables.

If I’ve inserted any rows into a global temporary table, by definition no other session can see my data, so the first consideration, concurrency, is not an issue.

Also, if I’m not expecting to ever insert many rows into my global temporary table, I can be reasonably confident that performance will not be an issue either. Plus, if I put an index on the ID column, that query will be quite inexpensive.

Conclusion: if you are using global temporary tables, you don’t have to use sequences to generate unique identifiers for them. I’m not saying you shouldn’t, of course – a sequence may be faster, and may even lead to simpler code in some cases – but in other cases you might decide to forego a sequence – one less object, with perhaps its role grants and synonyms, to deploy.

Now, of course, you have to ask yourself, why query the table at all? Why not store that latest ID in a private global variable in a package? In fact, we can create a simple package to replace the sequence, e.g.:

END my_table_pkg;
    g_latest_id := NVL(g_latest_id, 0) + 1;
    RETURN g_latest_id;
  END next_id;
END my_table_pkg;

Well, now you know what to do. Whenever you need to generate a unique set of identifiers for a global temporary table, you’ve got a choice of options: sequence, package variable, or a “max(id)+1” query.

New apex web site:

I’ve just opened my new web site, built entirely in Oracle Application Express, and announced it on my other blog: has been built with just one simple purpose – to help you keep track of your home contents. It’s in “beta” status at the moment, so I’m keen to get as many people as possible to try it out to flesh out any bugs.”

Please check it out, and let me know what you think!