Month: October 2010

Count All Rows in a Schema

I wrote this simple SQL*Plus script to loop through all the user’s tables and report how many rows were in them at this point in time. Normally I might estimate this information based on the table statistics, but in this case I had to know if any rows had been inserted since the last stats were gathered. Also, I preferred not to just run the stats gathering job. Obviously, it doesn’t pick up any uncommitted data.

It doesn’t list the tables which have zero (0) rows, but it report how many tables it counted, and the total number of rows across the entire schema.

If run on an 11g database, it will skip the count on tables which have had no segment created yet.

WARNING: this script is suitable for development environments only. Use at your own risk.

SET SERVEROUT ON FEEDBACK OFF
DECLARE
  c  INTEGER;
  tc INTEGER := 0;
  tr INTEGER := 0;
BEGIN
$IF DBMS_DB_VERSION.VER_LE_10 $THEN
  DBMS_OUTPUT.enable(1000000);
$ELSE
  DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('Only tables with segment created are counted.');
$END
  FOR r IN (
    SELECT table_name
    FROM   user_tables
$IF DBMS_DB_VERSION.VER_LE_10 $THEN
$ELSE
    WHERE  segment_created = 'YES'
$END
    ORDER BY table_name
    )
    LOOP
    tc := tc + 1;
    BEGIN
      EXECUTE IMMEDIATE REPLACE(
        'SELECT COUNT(*) FROM "#TABLE#"'
        ,'#TABLE#',r.table_name)
        INTO c;
      tr := tr + c;
      IF c > 0 THEN
        DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line(
          RPAD(r.table_name,31,' ')
          || TO_CHAR(c,'9G999G999G990'));
      END IF;
    EXCEPTION
      WHEN OTHERS THEN
        DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line(r.table_name);
        DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line(DBMS_UTILITY.format_error_stack);
    END;
  END LOOP;
  DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('counted '
    || tc || ' table(s)');
  DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('total rows '
    || TO_CHAR(tr,'9G999G999G990'));
END;
/
SET SERVEROUT OFF FEEDBACK ON

Example output:

SQL> @count_all_tables
Only tables with segment created are counted.
counted 1 table(s)
total rows              0

This tells me that there are no rows yet, and of all the tables, only one has had a segment created for it (e.g. perhaps an INSERT was attempted but rolled back, or the row was deleted). I’m sure you’ll be able to adapt the script to suit your obsessive record-counting needs.

Difference Between Two Timestamps

Easy, right? Perhaps not as straightforward as you’d think.

Method #1: use EXTRACT

extract(day from (x-y))*24*60*60
+ extract(hour from (x-y))*60*60
+ extract(minute from (x-y))*60
+ extract(second from (x-y))

Method #2: use CAST

( CAST( x AS DATE ) - CAST( y AS DATE ) ) * 86400

The difference? Method #2 is faster (my tests indicate faster by a factor of 3), but does not include fractional seconds. Method #1 is a bit slower, but includes fractions of a second. See the SO link for details.